3. SW Herts today: (a) Our environment

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Climate emergency

  • All five South West Herts local authorities, as well as Hertfordshire County Council, have declared a climate emergency and the Hertfordshire Climate Change and Sustainability Partnership (HCCSP) was established in January 2020.
  • Further action is required to meet, and ideally exceed, the Government’s target of net zero carbon by 2050.
  • Area’s water resources are under particular pressure, witWater use is 16% higher than the national averageh lower than average annual rainfall, a growing population, and water use higher than the national average.

Home to important landscapes

  • Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) characterised by its chalk streams, commons and beech woodlands, part of which is designated as a ‘Special Area of Conservation’.
  • Colne Valley Regional Park, connecting Rickmansworth with the Thames.
  • A wide range of public open spaces, such as the award winning Cassiobury Park and Verulamium Park, plus historic gardens, woodlands, and lakes.
  • The Grand Union Canal is a key asset that could be further enhanced and utilised for wildlife and recreation.

Home to 88 Conservation Areas

Strong historic heritage

  • Numerous listed buildings, many of which are located in designated Conservation Areas.
  • Scheduled Ancient Monuments such as Berkhamsted Castle and St Albans Cathedral, which is thought to be the oldest site of continuous Christian worship in Britain.

Access to green space9 Registered Parks and Gardens

  • Making better use of the land between our buildings and informal open space can help improve our public areas, improve connectivity with green spaces, support biodiversity and help mitigate the effects of climate change.
  • Access to high quality green space can have a positive impact on our well-being.
  • The Covid pandemic has made us value both public and private open space more than ever, with green space especially important to those living in more built-up parts of the area.
  • The greening of urban areas can also help support biodiversity, link up wildlife corridors and lessen the impacts of climate change.

40 Green Flag Award winning parks

Attractive as a home for businesses and people

  • High quality natural environment that makes the area attractive as a location for businesses and a desirable place to live.

Select another option below relating to 'South West Herts Today'.


Climate emergency

  • All five South West Herts local authorities, as well as Hertfordshire County Council, have declared a climate emergency and the Hertfordshire Climate Change and Sustainability Partnership (HCCSP) was established in January 2020.
  • Further action is required to meet, and ideally exceed, the Government’s target of net zero carbon by 2050.
  • Area’s water resources are under particular pressure, witWater use is 16% higher than the national averageh lower than average annual rainfall, a growing population, and water use higher than the national average.

Home to important landscapes

  • Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) characterised by its chalk streams, commons and beech woodlands, part of which is designated as a ‘Special Area of Conservation’.
  • Colne Valley Regional Park, connecting Rickmansworth with the Thames.
  • A wide range of public open spaces, such as the award winning Cassiobury Park and Verulamium Park, plus historic gardens, woodlands, and lakes.
  • The Grand Union Canal is a key asset that could be further enhanced and utilised for wildlife and recreation.

Home to 88 Conservation Areas

Strong historic heritage

  • Numerous listed buildings, many of which are located in designated Conservation Areas.
  • Scheduled Ancient Monuments such as Berkhamsted Castle and St Albans Cathedral, which is thought to be the oldest site of continuous Christian worship in Britain.

Access to green space9 Registered Parks and Gardens

  • Making better use of the land between our buildings and informal open space can help improve our public areas, improve connectivity with green spaces, support biodiversity and help mitigate the effects of climate change.
  • Access to high quality green space can have a positive impact on our well-being.
  • The Covid pandemic has made us value both public and private open space more than ever, with green space especially important to those living in more built-up parts of the area.
  • The greening of urban areas can also help support biodiversity, link up wildlife corridors and lessen the impacts of climate change.

40 Green Flag Award winning parks

Attractive as a home for businesses and people

  • High quality natural environment that makes the area attractive as a location for businesses and a desirable place to live.

Select another option below relating to 'South West Herts Today'.